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Shark and Olive is curated by a Portland-based creative, painter, and art enthusiast. Shark and Olive features finds that represent a never-ending celebration of art, architecture, design objects, and furniture.

Posts tagged design
Modern Mondays: Portland's Architecutral Resources from the Recent Past

Looking at efforts to repair and utilize some of Portland’s recent past architectural resources.
DoCoMoMo_Oregon, a local chapter of DoCoMoMo_US, is a non-profit organization dedicated to promoting the interest, education, and advocacy of the architecture, art, landscape, and urban design of the Modern Movement. Recently the Board voiced concerns for the type of alterations proposed for the late modern (post modern!) PacWest Center designed by Hugh Stubbins & Associates / Skidmore, Owings & Merrill, which underwent a Design Advice. John Russell, the original developer of the project who chose Hugh Stubbins as the architect, from a shortlist that included Philip Johnson and Minoru Yamasaki, provided testimony that agreed with the design team that the retail in the building isn’t currently working, but that the building’s design isn’t the major contributor. Overall, the Design Commission encouraged the design team to treat the PacWest Center like a historic building, and use the Secretary of the Interior’s Standards as an approach for the renovation.

The Koin Tower, designed by ZGF Partnership in 1984, is one of the most prominent buildings in Portland’s downtown rising sky-line, and an example of Post Modern architecture. It is Post Modern with whimsical lines and historical references to Gothic, Spanish, and Deco architectural characteristics. (King, 106) However, unlike the Post Modern Portland Building (interiors designed by ZGF), the Koin Tower has been accepted for its architectural whimsy in a place with a known tag line, “Keep Portland Weird.”

And on a smaller scale that truly connects to placemaking, the Lovejoy Fountain Pavilion designed by Charles Moore in 1962 as part of Lawrence Halprin’s fountain sequence was thoughtfully restored in 2012.

Appreciating the Recent Past
So, has Portland come to appreciate its architectural heritage from the recent past? While these three examples offer a glimpse of optimism towards the maintenance and rehabilitation of architecture from the recent past, there is still an uphill battle towards the preservation and rehabilitation of Post Modern, Modern, and historic architectural resources. This is not an argument to save every resource, but it’s our responsibility to our present and future communities to have places rich in architectural resources from different movements of history- architecture rich in diversity. For architectural diversity contributes to our place making, culture, and identity. Let’s Keep Portland Architecture Weird by both adding to and maintaining and rehabilitating.

color punch part nine: rose quartz (blush pink!)

The Pantone 2016 colors are subtle, muted, yet charming and playful colors. While slated for this year’s colors, their subtle and charming nature allows for them to stay relevant for much longer. In this color punch round up, the focus is my favorite of the two colors, Rose Quartz. Who doesn’t love a light pink that is versatile enough to act as the main color or accent on textiles to wall treatments, as art or objects, and for furniture. Starting with the perfect mix of modern meets traditional, the linen glenlee sofa is beautiful as comfortable. Douglas and Bec's Line collection of lighting (table to floor) offers an elegant rose quartz light, which utilizes hand blown glass. For under foot a wool Moroccan rug with complementary colors provides a minimalist geometric focal point to your space. However, its texture and color can also be paired with furniture objects that provide a more boho energy.  And because my pillow obsession and collection is real, the dash pillow from leif shop is super soft thanks to its merino wool fabric. Rounding off this round-up is a beautiful print by Lene Norgaard. Rose Quartz, a subtle yet powerful color punch.

Color Punch Part Nine: Inspiring Tile

Tile isn't just for the bathroom and kitchen. Whether you go bold with color and pattern or streamline and traditional, tile is a great alternate flooring (or wall!) option to hardwoods and carpet. A large part of tile is the pattern created from solid color tiles or patterned tiles. Adding another dimension to creating pattern, is using curved ceramic tiles. Marazzi Progetto Tiennale via Archiform has beautiful curved ceramic tiles that spark a dialogue between present production and their inception in the 1960s. Additionally, they can be used as wall or floor tiles. Now for those that truly embrace the bold- sitio by commune slash tiles are amazing. They have a limited color palate, but the geometric pattern created is a tile trend worthy of lasting a lifetime. The herringbone pattern is quite traditional, but when executed in a bright color, the result is a classical revival (modern!). Another option is encaustic cement tile. It can be used for both floor and wall tiling, and has a nice smooth feel to its surface. And for those that love traditional Spanish / Mexican tile, Latin Accents is a great resource for sourcing.

Color Punch Part Eight: Textiles Under Foot

For this round-up of color-punch textiles it is all about rugs.  Rugs are a great starting point for setting the tone of a room.  I tend to love rooms with neutral tone furnitures with lovely wood accents, leaving the bold and geometric colors to the textiles.  My current favorites are woven rugs featuring beautiful pinks and oranges. These colors add warmth and a focal point to a space and are a design classic.  Moroccan and Turkish rugs have long been my favorite woven rugs, and luckily they are more available in the States.  The 1970s vintage pink one featured is perfectly worn and would look beautiful in any room. A slightly muted and variation on a theme version can be found at urban outfitters.  And I couldn't resist the playful boobie rug from cold picnic. Who doesn't love a little humor in ones space?

Modern Mondays: PoMo and MoMo are a No-No in Portland

Portland, and Oregon on the whole, has a substantial presence of Post-World War II architecture.  One of the more prominent mid-century works is the Veterans Memorial Coliseum.  Portland is also home for a post-modern work of architecture, Michael Grave’s designed Portland Public Service Building.  Locally, several mid-century modern, and especially post-modern, works of architecture are not held in high esteem from the design community through City leadership.  Yet, the City has approved locally designed mix-use developments that directly reference mid-century and post-modern design aesthetics.  When these new developments enter their middle age, will they too be called obsolete, tacky, and ugly?

Modern Mondays: Graphic Design + Architecture

Graphic design is a communication tool that plays an important role in architectural design. At its most fundamental level, graphic design visually communicates information with typography, color, and form. It also, and perhaps more importantly, influences our interaction with and the identity of place and space. From way-finding signage, supergraphics, branding, material and texture, to motion-graphics, graphic design helps integrate word and content with architecture.

Graphic design is used to visually communicate and reinforce the sense of identity for architectural projects – including both new design, renovation, and planning projects. From logo design, visitor orientation and infographics, graphic design is an integral part to the sense of place. It affects the overall experience with the visitor, public, or inhabitant. It is also dependent on the architectural design. Think of the range of materials and its finishes used through-out a building. Graphic design must be intentional, otherwise chaos results in color, type, and form within the design struggling against the architectural design, materials and texture.

Click the arrows above to view personal favorites of mid-century modern graphic design for architecture.

Color Punch Part Seven: Pastels & Marble

From home accessories, to textiles, lighting, and furniture, pastels have arrived. Pastels invoke warmth and a soft glow into the home. And the perfect complement to the soft touch of pastels is marble. For this color punch round-up of pastels and marble, lets begin with Firm Living's latest collection of Kelim Carpets.  These wool and cotton carpets invoke a relaxed mid-century vibe with muted pastel and earth tones. Hang on the wall as tapestry inspired art, or under foot. They add relaxed elegance to ones space. A complement to the softness of the Kelim Carpets is the Annex table (side & coffee) from Joe Doucet x Partners. These signed and numbered limited edition tables are snap fit in configuration - letting gravity hold them together. I love their angularity and the subtle 'x' remaining after configuration.  Anthropologie's House & Home line has made a great debut. The Rod & Weave chair is no exception. The gorgeously woven leather seat with pastel colored iron frame is a great combination to showcase in your home.  For table lighting with mid-century lines and a marble base there is the Clint Mini Task lamp. It works in the living room, on a pile of books in your office, or next to your bed. Personally, I like both upholstered and leather sofas. However, for pastel hues I would stick with fabric, and leave the natural tones for leather.  Pastels aren't just for art anymore.

Modern Mondays: Cape Cod Modernism

One of my favorite aspects of Cape Cod Modernism is how these design leaders of architectural modernism began by building for themselves. Their homes were their creative laboratories, anchored by a sense of place on the Outer Cape. I personally love the sense of experimentation with both material and spatial organization that is reflective in these modern residences built from the 1930s to the 1970s.  The Cape Cod Modern House Trust (CCMHT) has been preserving these homes and making them more available to the public since 2007. For more information on these homes, please visit CCMHT.

Color Punch Part Six: Interior Landscapes

It's that time of year again- time to switch out the textiles, rearrange some furniture, and hang a few new pieces of art. Now, its not fall yet, so no need to break out the heavier textiles. But it's the twilight of summer and I always find myself wanting one last burst of bright textured  color to recreate each interior landscape. I am a fan of slip-covers on couches. And they are a great way to change the feel of a space. I tend to go with a white or light colored slip-cover in the summer so I can punch up the blankets and pillows with pinks, aquas, greens, and oranges. Not a slip-cover fan? Then this multicolored lacquered steel chaise lounge is your alternative. For a pillow + rug refresh leif shop & the PS2014 collection from ikea offer great finds. Currently love the desert ocean & cabo colormix woven pillows and the flat woven PS rug with geometric detail. Another way to add color into your space and truly make an interior landscape is to add plants. Love the found image of plants in a dinning space from the portfolio of photographer Claudio Tajoli. Livens up the already colorful space.

Modern Mondays: MCM Italian Design

Not only masters of celebrating food and wine, Italians are forerunners in the world of design. I will be jetting off to Italy in the coming week, and I thought it would be fitting to have a Modern Monday that focuses on Italian furniture design. Clearly, I am a sucker for chairs, and this post features an adorable RIMA burnt coral armchair with an all metal frame. Perfect as a dinning chair with the Mario Bellini for Cassina table. I enjoy the monumental stature of the table mixed with the curvy lines of the RIMA armchair. Always on the hunt for lighting, the vintage Murano Chandelier by Cenedese is an elegant tubular delight. Prefer more whimsy in your home? Brass scones, “Il Diavolo” by Gio Ponti are essential. And, a space can never go wrong with modern brass and glass accessories.  Finally, a vintage metal desk (but could be used as a side table) adds a bit of masculine mid-mod pop. The dark wood and metal legs are timeless in their modernity.  Ciao a tutti!

Brass is Back

Brass is back. Forget those awful brass accents and finishes from the 1990s, because brass got a modern update (hello, no more lacquer) and is here to stay. Brass accents and finishes have an understated elegance and modernist aesthetic. It is strong, won’t rust, and has been reimagined into a variety of geometric forms. Brass also adds a natural pop of warmth to any space, and is a perfect complement to textiles. I love the versatility of brass. It can be used as a singular show stopping piece like side chairs done completely in brass. Or as accents like a task lamp and side table. Whether you are sublet or bold with your brass, this precious metal is here to stay. 

Modern Mondays: Kartell

Kartell is a longstanding favorite for modern and contemporary furniture design and production with a 60-year history to prove it. Kartell products are multifunctional and feature an astounding visual appeal with instances of playful wit. And the most important (perhaps the driving force behind the longevity of Kartell) is the constant evolution of material through technologies. Kartell materials are both functional and aesthetic fetes showcased in multidimensional collaborations with some of the words best designers. 

 

Modern Mondays: Bauhaus

The Bauhaus (1919-1933) was founded by German architect Walter Gropius. It is considered the most influential modernist art school of the twentieth-century. The Bauhaus incorporated both fine arts and design education, and at its core strove to re-imagine the material world to better reflect a unity of all the arts: architecture, sculpture, and painting as one unified creative expression. The school had renowned faculty including: Kandinsky, Albers, Mies van der Rohe an Marcel Breuer. 

Wood Matters Part Three: Angles and Lines

Furniture collections or stand-alone pieces that showcase  wood through unexpected angles and continuous lines are my favorite. Hugh MIller of HM Handmade features this in his Folded Record Bureau. And it is SO FABULOUS. The bureau recalls mid-century modern simplicity, but with contemporary originality. Love the angled storage areas for records, and how the turntable is flush with the table surface. I also love his backgammon table that incorporates magazine or book storage (or instructions on how to play). The pop of color and geometric detail along the table top make this piece all the better.  Another favorite of the moment is the New Alto home desk designed by Andreas Engesvik. The design incorporates a solid wood base with a delicate table top. I enjoy how the sides of the table top delicately flare upward, which juxtaposes its linear solid base.   Enjoy these beautiful wooden angles + and lines!

Not Your Grandmother's Wallpaper

I grew up with wallpaper around me, and forever will use this material in my home. Wallpaper adds texture, drama, color, and altogether fabulousness to any space.  For a monochromatic and geometric pop - Teepee wallpaper by Erica Wakerly is a must have.  The Hit Collection by Tres Tintas Barcelona is an updated modern take on a floral design. Calico has created a metallic wallpaper collection (need I say more). Farrow & Ball offers a wide range of wallpaper that is divine, sophisticated, and totally fun. Enjoy!

Chair Obsessions Part Three

I’ve said it before, but to reiterate - chairs are my favorite pieces of furniture.  Ariele of Brooklyn to West did an awesome reupholstery of a classic chair silhouette with a modern geometric textile. The Leftovers Chair by Lauren Davies is a beautiful assemblage of different species of wood.  Changing mediums and materials, Nicole Franzen lifestyles photograph of mis-matched leather chairs, a stool, and upright light capture a moment and space perfectly. The style featured on the Nyahem blog showcases natural materials mixed with modern handcrafted design; and how could I leave out a Victoria Ghost Chair by Kartell.

Get Outside

The hint of spring weather turning to summer Portland teased me with last weekend has me excited to get outdoors to do some serious lounging. I love Jaime Hayon's Gardenias Garden chairs and how dramatic, yet simple they are. Mal 1956 furniture remind me of what Don + Roger would sit in by the pool. Speaking of pools the splash of color from the Rosenbaum home in San Paolo is perfect against the bright aqua tile. However, if I could hop over to Greece to lounge about at the San Giorgio Boutique Hotel - I certainly would. And, I couldn't resist the romantic charm of the Lovelane Caravans. They are perfect for a fantastic rural retreat. It's time to get outside

Color Punch Part Two: Patterns
Naomi Stein's Home of Design Mainifest

Naomi Stein's Home of Design Mainifest

Patterns. Patterns are my favorite color. I enjoy a space, piece of furniture, textile, art, architecture, or clothing that incorporates a pattern. Put a monochromatic or incredible geometric pattern on a throw or pillow, and I can all but not have it. Luckily, spring is about bloom, which means it is about time to switch out the textiles and incorporate all things fresh, lively, and colorful.

Wood Matters

From dinning, to dressing, to sitting and storing i love all of these examples of handmade wood pieces of furniture. An added bonus - geometric patterns for an aesthetic punch of awesome.